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What to Say and How to Do: Writing Victorian Historical Fiction


By Sarah A. Chrisman

A Book Is A Time Machine

            A book is the best and cheapest time machine you will ever buy.  As a writer of books about the Victorian era I often think of myself as a tour guide to another time.  When showing my fellow travellers the delights of a foreign time, I always remember the importance of not only knowing the terrain through which we’re travelling, but of being respectful of its people as well.  Something I was once told about understanding modern cultures is just as applicable to understanding cultures defined by time rather than mere distance: on my first day of French class at university the professor opened her very first lecture by telling us, “French people do not say things in French because they mean them in English and just don’t know any better.  French people say things in French because they mean them in French!”  So, too, with people of different eras.  They were not modern people acting certain ways and doing certain things because they didn’t know any better: they were members of a vibrant culture of time.  If you are going to bring strangers into their world to walk amongst them, you must first understand them.

Choose A Destination

            Be very clear with yourself about the time and place that form your setting.  The Victorian era was very long and covered an immense diversity of places.  Tombstone, Arizona, of the 1880’s was very different from London of the same time, and Paris of 1900 was a radically different city from Paris of 1848.  A specific choice of where and when you’re going is the first step towards getting there.

Research, Research, Research!

            I draft all my manuscripts by hand – a number of interesting studies have shown that the creative process works differently when writing by hand than when typing.  Next to my desk is a wicker basket full of notebooks, and each one is devoted to a different book in my series.  In the back of each of these is a reading list I’ve compiled for myself of materials I want to either read or revisit before I start writing that particular story.  For example, I just finished a novel about a reporter in the American Pacific Northwest in 1889.  Looking at the reading list I assigned myself before I started writing his story, I see the memoirs of a 19th-century journalist; four Victorian-era style guides and two period articles on the subject of how to write for the press; five detective memoirs from the time; two 19th-century novels about journalists; a journalist’s trade magazine; and a number of books, magazines and newspaper articles related to my hero’s personality and the historic events through which he’s living – and this is all just background!  As I write a book, I’m constantly doing still more research and delving deeper into my characters’ world and their motivations.

            How do I put together these reading lists?  By constantly reading everything I can about the Victorian era and compulsively taking notes on them.  When I see a quote, fact or witticism that seems like it might fit into a particular story, I’ll jot it down in the notes I’m compiling for that story.  When I come across things that don’t fit with any planned project but are nonetheless worth remembering, I add them to my latest commonplace book.  This may seem like a slow and haphazard way to go about things at first, but once you’ve been at it a while you’ll be amazed at how much information you’ve compiled and how much more you’ve learned than a simple keyword search could have taught you.

Get Your Facts From the Original Sources

            Remember what I said about books being time machines and authors being tour guides?  Your research is your tour guide training, and it’s best to get that training first hand.  In other words, read materials actually written in the Victorian era, not just modern things about the Victorian era.  Think about it this way: if you landed a job giving tours of Paris, wouldn’t you rather learn your routes from a native-born Parisian than from someone who’d never been there? 

            So many written materials of all sorts were produced during the Victorian era there’s really no excuse for not reading some of them.  Try to read the same materials your characters would have been reading.  If you’re writing about a middle-class American woman, read Godey’s magazine or period issues of Good Housekeeping.  If you’re writing humor about late 19th-century London, read the hilarious novel, The Diary of a Nobody.  If your hero’s a doctor read The Lancet; for a nurse read the works of Florence Nightingale.  

            You can buy a wide variety of antique or reprinted books through websites like Abebooks.com and eBay.  Digital copies of many hard-to-find works can be downloaded for free by using the Google Books Advanced Search function, and you can then print these out and bind them into a hardcopy format.  Don’t forget about period newspapers, too!  Many communities operate digital archives of their periodicals, and these can be absolute goldmines for knowing exactly what was really happening at the precise time of your story.

            My favorite resources of all are diaries written in the 19th-century.  A surprising number of these have been published – I highly recommend Maud: The Illustrated Diary of a Victorian Woman.  Large archives often contain original diaries from people associated with their institutions; and if you’re very lucky you can sometimes find original diaries for sale from rare book dealers or even on eBay.  There is no more intimate connection to an era than reading the hand-written diary of someone who lived through it.

Some Travel Tips

            Before I send you along on your journeys, oh fellow tour guides, here are a few tips for your journey:

            —Avoid Anachronisms.  I don’t need to tell you not to give your Victorian heroine a cell phone.  Be aware, though, that it’s just as inappropriate to give her modern opinions and motivations.  Unless you are literally writing a time travel story DON’T give it a heroine who reads like she just stepped out of the twenty-first century.  Respect the world and culture you’re depicting by learning as much about it as you possibly can, then write characters appropriate to that world.

            —Don’t Stereotype.  Don’t insert modern characters into historical settings, but don’t fill those settings with flat clichés, either.  Remember that you are painting a picture of a diverse community where every individual has a complex personal history.  Flesh out those backgrounds for yourself and you can make the world come to life for your readers.

            —A Couple Basic Guide Books.  Every work of historical fiction has an entire library behind it, but there are a couple types of books that are useful to every writer of the genre.  You’ll want a period style guide.  My personal favorite is Wolstan Dixey’s The Trade of Authorship from 1889.  (Give particular attention to pp. 74-91, “The Trade”.)  Familiarizing yourself with writing advice from the time will help you settle into a style of your own that feels natural for the period.  Besides this writing guide, you’ll also benefit from a period etiquette guide.  I’m a fan of Hill’s Manual of Social and Business Forms.  This will give you a succinct overview of advice from the time and help you (and your characters) avoid common pitfalls.

Bon Voyage!            Your readers are depending on you to bring them to another time and place.  Be worthy of their trust by learning as much as you can about their destination and presenting it in a respectful and realistic way.  Pleasant journeys and happy trails! 

— 

“Books are the windows through which the mind looks out.” —Anonymous, Zion’s Home Monthly, January 15, 1889. p. 197.

Written by Sarah A. Chrisman

Historical Fiction Writing with Universal Class LESSON 2

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ELEMENTS OF HISTORICAL FICTION

Every genre of fiction has its own special elements. The elements of historical fiction are varied. They include characterisation, setting, plot themes, and specific styles and tones.

Characterization

Let’s start with characters.

Your characters may be real people that have lived in the past.

Oftentimes, these people are famous but, of course, they do not have to be. You may do research on someone who lived in the past and shape your story around them in order to give more notice to that character. They may be someone you feel should be noted for deeds accomplished but so far, is a bit overlooked, historically speaking.



A recent novel titled Alice I Have Been by Melanie Benjamin is a good example of this. This is a historical fiction novel that tells the story of the girl who would later become Alice in Lewis Carroll’s, Alice in Wonderland. Additionally, it tells a bit of the story behind Lewis Carroll.

The story is historical fiction because we could never be privy to all of these conversations and thoughts, but for all the research the author did, we have an excellent idea of how things were and what happened.

Another option is to create completely original characters who are not based on anyone who has ever lived. If you do this, in order to make it historical fiction, you must set your characters in a historical period. Choose a specific date or event and then do as much research as you can to bring the story to life.



One thing that happens in historical fiction–that happens in all fiction, is that your characters will change over the course of your novel. The difference here is that this usually occurs because the characters are shaped by their settings.

Setting

The setting of your novel is so very important in historical fiction, almost more so than in any other genre of fiction. It is almost a character in itself. Your characters are shaped by it. Because your story is historical and set in the past, your characters will be defined by it.

It means you must also research the moral constraints of the time period.

What were the social constructs of the day?

What was acceptable and unacceptable in terms of behavior?

As your characters are shaped by this, they will change and grow throughout the story based on these morals, constraints, and patterns of behavior.

It is also important to note that you will set your story in a specific geographical place and time. This will require lots of research. Make sure you know everything you need to know about your chosen place and time, and everything your readers will want and need to know to help them through the story.

We will talk more about research in a later lesson, but be prepared. Know that research is your best friend and the most essential tool when writing for this genre.




Plot Elements

The plot elements in an historical fiction novel can be quite unique, especially when compared to the plots of other genres. For example, the problem or problems in your historical fiction novel will usually be a result of the time and place that the story is occurring.

Another way that your conflicts or problems will be a result of time or place may simply be those moral constraints we talked about before. If you are writing a historical fiction romance novel, the courtship rituals were much different back then and this could be your characters’ problem, or it could be some type of familial censuring, such as an arranged marriage, which is causing the difficulties in your story.

Your research will be a great help in showing the reader this problem and allowing them to understand where your characters are coming from.

You want your readers to read along and really feel as if your story happened, the way readers do in Alice I Have Been. You cannot possibly know everything about the characters or the time period, you want your readers to feel that you do. They should be so swept up in your writing that they never stop to question or contradict a point. This is where a good, solid plot line comes in, as does good, solid research.

Theme

The themes of historical fiction are somewhat similar to the themes of any genre, which mostly is good versus evil. However, in historical fiction, we use the people and events from the past to shed light upon some basic truth about the past.

Style and Tone

The style of an historical fiction novel includes a great deal of detail. You want to use as much accuracy as possible. Your reader must feel like they are there, in the story, in that place and time, if you want to be successful.

Style is a very important element when writing for this genre.

If you were to write an historical fiction novel without giving any thought to the style, it might come out a little, well, odd. Because you live today and you are writing about the past, the language, word choice, vocabulary, etc. might not sound quite right. What you need to do is to come up with a style and a tone that fit with your story.

For an assignment I have to choose one historical figure and characterise them, so off I go! There is an assignment to complete for this lesson for that and then an exam to submit.

I think character is important and setting are the main ones you have to start off with as it sets the tone for the rest of your writing.

I have a novel in the works while I write this, and have written three chapters but I may have to learn to be more verbose and include more dialogue in it as I included in my first assignment in the first blog post series I did for this. I mentioned in my Introduction that I am more descriptive rather than putting lots more dialogue but I believe that you have to have a balance.

This next week I will be working on the rest of the Lesson while working at small goals of assignments and exams for each lesson, so I will post each lesson on the blog!

I hope you enjoy!

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A List of my Favourite Author Blogs

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This week has been a little more hectic compared to my normal lifestyle of listening to music, watching my favourite TV shows and movies on Netflix or Google play, and reading a few books here and there and then using my new laptop to play my digital piano and record some songs for fun. I have started volunteering at Save the Children in Malaga which is a 10 minute drive down the road from me and I was excited to be starting there yesterday as they put me straight onto the “books”! in the warehouse. It is a fun job and I think for now it is the perfect job for me three days a week as I don’t have a permanenent full time job or anything, but I have one thing in the pipes music wise, so lets hope that works out down the line but that is another story for another time! I will keep you updated!


So, I started on unpacking books, and putting them into their categories, and I learnt a lot already just from the first two hours of working there!
I even remembered when they had a box for Art that that was the number 700 from the Dewey Decimal Classification System, so my brain was quite on par library wise!

It is so fun to be able to do the work, but lets see how its goes down the track! I recognised a lot of authors names, Dan Brown, Robert Ludlum, Di Morissey, you will always recognise author names when working in books, and so I have decided to make this post a little more delightful and create a list of my favourite authors names but also put their blog link with it so it gives you the chance to be able to check them out!!!!



My first and favourite one is:

1. Carrie Turansky – carrieturansky.com – this is such a stunning page and my favourite book of hers is “The Governess of Highland Hall”. I have probably mentioned that way too many times before! Her latest release is “No Journey too far” and I have read the rest of the Edwardian Bride Series and Shine like the Dawn. I want to get No Ocean too wide and Across the blue. You can sign up to her newsletter on her website and she also has a Book List!

2. Alena Kate Pettitt – of “The Darling Academy” – I just absolutely love the writings of her book Ladies Like Us as she goes through such beautiful topics such as Being a lady, being a darling!, emotional and social intelligence, and poise. My favourite section was on Defining your goals and aspirations as it really honed in on setting lifetime goals, and attitudes of the heart! It is beautiful written and you will not be disappointed if you purchase Ladies like us. She also has another book called English Etiquette which I want to get for myself! You can buy her books HERE.

3. DickensBlog – a Blog for all things Dickens! Here you can experience a blog page that promotes Charles Dickens’ books. There is a book you can get through this page called The Gospel in Dickens: Selections from His Work. It is $18US. I particularly liked the fact that on the 6th September 2020 that did an online conversation with a descendant of his!!! You will find this on the blog page link provided if you click on “A blog for all things Dickens!” You can easily subscribe.

4. Natasha Lester – This is particularly one of my favourites as she shares her “Writing Routine. ” She writes blogs that are more succinct and concise. For example, you should read How to Fit Writing Into Your Life: 6 Tips Based on My Writing Process on her website at natashalester.com.au. If you are a writer yourself, then articles and blogs are the way to go for you to read. It will give you so much more inspiration and will drive you to be a better writer!!!

I have the first two of her books.

The Paris seamstress

You will find this picture on my Instagram page.

The French photographer

She blogs every Tuesday and really sets her time working on her novels as you can see through her writing and blogs. So keep your eyes peeled every Tuesday, and her newsletters go out every Tuesday as well. So make sure to subscribe to her newsletter on the right hand side of the page/website.

I am excited to see her bring out The Paris Secret, but I am still on The Paris Seamstress and sooooooo excited and looking forward to reading the French Photographer as it looks completely stunning.

I don’t want to overload you with too many author blog pages, so I will stick to four for now and if I think of any more that I tend to read for myself I will create a Part 2!

So keep your eyes peeled incase I do do a part 2 of this blog. I hope that you enjoyed reading about these four favourite author blog pages of mine, and that you click on them and browse through them. There are some gems! and you never know some giveaways might be around the corner!

Emmalisa

xx

Do you have a favourite author blog?

If you don’t follow a blog of an author, do you follow any other type of bloggers?

Novel Writing 101 – Lesson 1 and 2

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Now that I am qualified as a Library Assistant and I have completed Styling Essentials, lots of new things are in the works.

I decided to take a novel writing course – a short one – online – so that I can further develop enhance my skills in that area of writing, so I am not just freely blogging, or typing away with no thought. Novel writing is not careless, it is complex, and there is so much to it that I thought it would be a challenge to take up a new course in something else that I love and am passionate about!

It is through Universal Class which is the same provider I used online when doing the Historical Fiction writing course online as well.

You start out with being shown what your Learning outcomes are, such as:

Defining what a novel is

Describe working philosophy

Summarize novel writing methods

Select a specific class to write about

Select a specific genre to write about

Select a point of view

Summarize manuscript formatting

Create a storyboard

Define the synopsis

Summarize 5 elements involved in fiction writing

Describe building character development

Describe plot/conflict development

Summarize plot requirements

Create the setting, theme, style and tone

Create the climax, identify critical scenes. Recognise cause and effect.

Create proper dialog and illustrative details

Write a conclusion. Edit and revise. Publish the work.

Lets begin with the first lesson!

LESSON 1

Definition of. a novel

“If there’s a book you really want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.”– Nobel Prize-winning American author Toni Morrison

With origins dating back to poetic prose from thousands of years ago — Elizabethan times, fanciful French romance narratives from the mid-17th century, and episodic, central-figure adventures from the Spanish Don Quixote era — novel writing is an art form that has long been an integral part of our culture.

WHAT IS A NOVEL?

  1. A fictional prose narrative of considerable length, typically having a plot that is unfolded by the actions, speech, and thoughts of the characters
  2. The literary genre represented by novels

In our contemporary world, the use of “novel” has shifted to focus more on the central character, than on the plot. Also playing a defining role in the novel, is the sense of realism. novels are developed as fictional stories the underlying element inherent in all are truisms based upon human behaviour and the ways in which we interact with others.

Novel Features

As a whole, the three primary features of a traditional novel include:

  • A cohesive, believable plot structure
  • Well-defined, credible characters
  • A strong undercurrent of reality

It has been said that a work of fiction is measured by how well, or poorly, the author is able to unify the story and control its impact. Therefore, the only obligation of the writer is to make the story flow well for the reader, and have strong elements of interest.

Classic Examples

  • Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility (1811), and Pride and Prejudice (1813); 
  • Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre (1847); 
  • Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights (1847); 
  • Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter (1850); 
  • Herman Melville’s Moby Dick (1851); 
  • Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884);
  • F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby (1925); 
  • Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises (1926); 

Can anyone write a novel?

wanting to write a novel, and actually writing it, are entirely different things. In order to produce a novel, you first will need to create a structure around your project, define your objectives, and prioritize this project in your life to ensure you follow it through to completion.

Novel Writing: Rewards and Payoffs

Attracted by the following rewards and personal payoffs, many people do go forth with their plans to write a novel.

  • Satisfaction of achieving a hard-earned goal.
  • Medium to utilize creative skills, which may not otherwise be used in one’s professional life
  • Opportunity to hone one’s writing skills
  • Forum to focus one’s ideas and life experiences
  • Area over which one does not need to conform to anyone’s standards or rules
  • Outlet to showcase one’s theories, ideas and creative visions (albeit masked within a work of fiction)
  • Ego-gratification endeavor, culminating in one’s name appearing on the book jacket of countless copies
  • Lasting legacy

Regardless of what becomes of the finished product — picked up by a publisher, self-published, bestseller, etc. — the fact that you stayed the course in writing your novel is something that will remain with you for your entire lifetime.

Committing to the generation of your novel, and seeing it through to completion, is an endeavor that will leave you with a new-found confidence that will carry over on to any project you put before yourself.

Ideally, the following chapters will help you feel more secure with the novel-writing process and, thus, better able to navigate as you head out on this memorable journey.

I had to upload an assignment

Lesson 1 Assignment

Here is what I did:

My favourite novel that I like to read is called The Governess of Highland Hall and the Author of the novel is called CARRIE TURANSKY

I am a sucker for English Historical Romance novels, and when I read this front to back, I loved it from the characters to the setting to the situations etc. It is a perfect and ideal novel to look at as it is my favourite english historical novel based in England.

This is one of my favourite books because I am a sucker for English Historical novels and out of all the ones I have read, this by far has to be my favourite because of the story, and the writing is so easy to read, yet so eloquent and very English at the same time without it being too verbose. 

It gives you a beautiful feel overall when reading, because of the choice of words, and the way it is written. The author puts words in a very articulate and expressive way through the characters view points and sets a delightful tone throughout the story. 

When the reader is reading this kind of book I believe that they would be experiencing something pleasant as even though there is a section with conflict, the way it is beautifully written, it would give a feeling of delightfulness, which is also captivating, enchanting, joyful and cheerful. 

I also had to submit three paragraphs for my novel and submit an Exam.

LESSON 2

“If you want to be a writer, you must do two things above all others: Read a lot and write a lot…reading is the creative center of a writer’s life…you cannot hope to sweep someone else away by the force of your writing until it has been done to you.”– Stephen King

Novel Writing Boot Camp 101

Writing Schedules”Try to write every day; if you don’t, you’ll lose the rhythm of your prose, as well as features of the plot, characters and, most importantly, your ‘voice’, the very timbre of the book that you are trying to maintain.” 
— David Armstrong, author of How Not to Write a Novel: Confessions of a Mid-list Author

Thus, in order to acquire a manner of discipline around your novel writing process, the first thing you will want to do (before mapping out the story lines, or fleshing out your characters), is to assess your project in terms of the total time it will require you to invest.

Once you have gained an idea as to the amount of time your novel will demand of you, you will then be able to determine when — during the course of your busy life — you will realistically be able to sit down, concentrate, and write.

if we were to effectively use the time on our writing that we spend aimlessly wandering the Internet or mindlessly watching television, then we should be able to carve out a sufficient number of writing sessions per week.

Focus/Motivation

After formulating a working writing schedule, you can shift your focus to the best ways for sustaining your motivation and ability to focus solely on your novel.

It is at this point that you may find yourself falling somewhat short in your ability to hold your attention throughout long, intense writing sessions. Fortunately, should you find this to be the case, there are numerous methods you can employ to increase your levels of concentration and motivation.Capturing your ability to focus on one activity for a sustained period of time, is something that can be greatly enhanced by integrating some form of regular meditation into your life. The simple act of learning how to sit still, and focus your mind, offers immeasurable benefits. Not only can it increase the satisfaction you derive on a daily basis, it can also contribute to your writing, in terms of allowing you to hold your thoughts for longer periods, and to explore multiple story scenarios without losing sight of the principle idea.

Helpful Novelist Tips

Chart your progress — Documenting the number of hours worked per day, and specific novel-related tasks accomplished, can be helpful in numbers of ways

Create an incentive for meeting your daily/monthly/overall writing goals — If you need to encourage yourself to stay on course, you may want to build in a series of goal-oriented incentives. 

upon wrapping up the entire novel, do something very, very nice for yourself! Go to the movies, buy yourself a new piece of jewellery, perhaps a pretty journal like I posted in my previous post, 4 Books to read this year in 2020. And buy yourself some flowers if no one else is going to buy them for you!

Good Health

As a whole, it is probably most important that, as you divide your time up among your family, friends, work, and writing, you pay attention to what you are eating, the amount of sleep you are getting, the time you are allocating to physical fitness activities, and the degree to which you are using stimulants, e.g., tobacco and caffeine.

While you are attempting to stay focused and encouraged, it is essential that you take good care of yourself to ensure that your productivity and the quality of your work do not suffer.

Lesson articles featured are:

How to overcome writers block: 14 tricks that work

Lesson 2 Assignment was:

Exercise: To get a realistic sense of the amount of work/time you will need to commit to writing your novel, take a few moments to look at your calendar and block out the day\times you can allocate to the project. You can begin by answering the following questions: 

1.  Realistically, how much time will you be able to commit per week to writing?

2.  Do you have an ideal timeframe for completing your novel?

3.  What types of activities, e.g., exercise, meditation, establishing calming environments can help you get and stay motivated during your blocked out writing sessions? 

I am about to submit this exercise tonight and then tomorrow will work on Lesson 3!

I showed you my example of my first assignment in Lesson 1.

In the comments tell me if you would enjoy doing a course on Novel Writing. Would you do Novel Writing 101?

What is your favourite novel to read?

Can you write Lesson 2’s exercise in the comments below?

Do you like to write during the day or night?

If you could quit your job and write for a living would you do it?

Emmalisa

BOOK! The Kings Mistress byGillian Bagwell


She would do ANYTHING for the man she loved

Her love knew no bounds……

As a noble mans daughter Jane Lane longs for a life outside the price lived walls of her family home.

Her quiet world is shattered when Royalists arrive one night, pleading for help.

They have been hiding the King, but Cromwell’s forces are close behind them, baying for Charles II’s blood – and anyone who helps him.

Putting herself in mortal danger, Jane must help the King escape by disguising him as her manservant.

With the shadow of the gallows following their every step, Jane finds herself falling for the gallant young Charles.

But will she surrender to a passion that could change her life – and the course of history?

The UNFORGETTABLE TRUE story of CHARLES II’s escape, and the love and bravery of the woman who made it POSSIBLE.

This is DEFINITELY perfect for fans of PHILLIPA GREGORY AND ELIZABETH CHADWICK

Be warned there is a swear word if your Christian ✝️


Book Review on the way!

A Soul on Purpose – Live your life by design, Regain your confidence and ignite your purpose by Luisa Aiasecca BOOK REVIEW


I am NOT going to apologise for gravitating towards the second paragraph on the FIRST  page of this book – There are three things to consider before we can live the life of our dreams and move forward…………

I absolutely LOVE the title of this chapter as we need to take a step back and examine our lives very now and then.

It is TOO true that Google and Siri are there in font of our noses every day when we need something to ask or rely on 24/7. It has become the worlds MOST reliable source that we need to examine ourselves fully. I love how Luisa included exercises to make you participate in a book and not just rad it from cover to back page and then forget what you read and then move on not thinking about what you read. This is the type of book where for me, I had to sit down in a quiet place away from everyone and everything o that I could fully immerse myself into and really ate my teeth into.

I love how Luisa is a “goal getter”, “dream setter” and looking to help others achieve a desire to reach a higher level by reading her/this book.

The first chapter asks 3 great questions.

  1. What do you want?
  2. Why do you want it?
  3. What’s stopping you?

So when I asked myself what do you want? I thought about ALOOOTTTT of things here as I am a very passionate and creative minded person, my mind literally thinks a zillion and one things a day, and I think a lot of girls are like that in this world. We have to identify, as Luisa says why we want something SOOOOOO baddddd. When we start out in a business or as an entrepreneur you then have to put things into perspective as to hat Simon Sinek says (a quote in the book) “Why is all about your purpose, cause or belief. Why do you or your company exist? Why do you get out of bed in the morning? AND WHY should anyone care?

I wrote a little timetable here on the three questions asked.

What do you want?                                      Why do you want it?            Whats stopping you?

Live in London, Melbourne or New York   My top 3 favourite cities.            Money

Library Assistant job/role.     It is the qualification I am working towards (Only have two subjects to complete it)

FREEEEDOM!!!!!                So I can live where I want when I want and do what I want.    Currently having to live in Perth, Western Australia

I particularly LOVE how Luisa says your “why” s your unique and personal motivation to go on when times get tough. It is a ‘reminder’ of what is closest to your heart ❤ what commands you to RISE! Push through ANY limitation! obstacle or challenge you might face.

I love her outgoing passion on how she helped a lady get going with her dream of starting a jewellery business – when you share something with someone, she really gets excited and I LOVE that about her!

I love that she is determined to “live life on her own terms”, wants the ability to go on overseas trips with family whenever she wants! be able to buy and build properties to create a portfolio for family, living life beyond limitations that other people put on her, have the freedom and experience the freedom to do things that she LOVES!!!! Time freedom and finance are the three main things people talk about a lot in this world’s whomever your community is, find your tribe and love them hard.

Chapter Two

Who you are is more important than WHAT you do

In this section Luisa talks about seasons, my favourite season has ALWAYS been Spring! Cherry blossoms, and blueberries and all the English garden roses you can think of!

Although as Luisa says she loves summer as I moved to Western Australia in 2013 and hate it at first, but getting used to it more over time, it has GROWN on me, I thought I wasn’t a “WA” girl at first but I was born in Subiaco, and grew up in Morley from the age 3-10 and we moved about in WA as a baby I just didn’t know it! haha!

Western Australia does have some beauty! ❤

“Just like the weather, there are different seasons in life. Some re abundant in goodness, overflowing with positive results and just seem to be more fun, Others can be tough”

She is VERY right that the summer season is FUN! and full of Extroverts! too true! A lot happing & fast paced, it gets more busier during that season especially in western Australia! Autumn can be slow – and I LOVE how Luisa says this is a perfect time to correct and shape our perspective to reflect our truest hearts intention. Perspective governs all our choices and actions which derive from our convictions.

“It is necessary to be steadfast in commitment to our long term goals, rather than changing course to defeat boredom or impatience that creeps in”

I particularly LOVED the saying ‘a stormy season will pass, and the sun will come out again…..” ❤

But if the sun is shining, allow yourself to enjoy it and receive the blessings that are coming your way.

There are a few GOLDEN nuggets in this next section…..

CHARACTER, INTEGRITY & AUTHENTICITY ARE ABOUT LEADING YOURSELF FIRST

This bit here…… simply defined, our character is made up of the habits and qualities, we implement, and integrity tells us who we really are.

Our character is made up of our mental and moral qualities, unique to us and modelled through our integrity, personality, nature and actions.

None of us are perfect, and we all have areas we can develop. Our personalities are not meant to confine us, but to grow and develop. Our personalities are not meant to confine us, but to grow and develop. If we deliberately use our strengths for others benefit and grow in our limitations, we will inspire others to do the same.

“Shaping our character will take deliberate effort and action against our gaps, flaws and weaknesses, to progressively become the best and most complete version of ourselves.

C. S. Lewis – Integrity is doing the right thing even when no one is watching…….

“PROGRESS OVER PERFECTION”

I found this absolutely beautiful.

“Where you are right now doesn’t determine your future because you are full of potential, wired for creativity, and destined for greatness. you can achieve more and ascend to greater heights all the time The journeys circumstance, positive or negative, force us to progress, unwrap gifts and talents weren’t aware of, and develop into the best version of ourselves.

I LOVED this!!!!!

“A superficial success is not the aim; rather, living a life from the inside out, full of value and building a legacy to be proud of should be and believe is our intention.”

AIM TO LIVE FROM THE INSIDE OUT

Clarity and conviction of our personal desires, belief systems and values will lead us to live our life by design, rather than by default.

I particularly love how Luisa talks about self-transendence over self-actualisation and that is about fulfilling your own potential, while self-transendence is about putting our own needs aside to serve something greater than ourselves.

Reaching your greatest potential by understanding Gods purpose for your life and helping others do the same isn’t just about living at your greatest point of development – it’s your destiny.

I LOVED this even more – Our destiny is not just about what we do, it is about who we become.

What was ABSOLUTELY brilliant was the illustration on Abraham Lincoln in referring to the topic of failure, He failed at business twice, he lost when he ran for Congress, senate and vice presidential candidate, before being elected as president. I love how Luisa states that his most VALUEABLE assets weren’t his education or advantages but his resilience and response to failure.

Failure comes before success……..

There are more quotes in the book that I absolutely love…..

Achieving true greatness is not about being better than anyone else, it is about being better than you were before, and there is no better test than the test of failure.

Each of us has our own personal WOW factor to shine on the world and serve our community with, but if those gifts are not embodied by a strength and unwavering persistence, they may go unseen.

We are on a journey of growth because the possibilities and our potential are limitless.

Who we are becoming is always more important than what we do.

But only becoming the best version of yourself will give you access to achieving the dreams and desire of your heart, and failure is a part of that journey. DON’T despise failure BUT learn how to make your failures serve your purposes. 

my FAVOURITE quote is this:

I really think a champion is defined not by their wins, but by how they can remove when they fall – Serena Williams

Chapter 3

What’s blocking your growth and how to overcome it

When you go to a job interview I always find that they constantly ask about your strengths and weaknesses, I am strong in Data/Administration work and I have seen the fruits of my labour from working full-time in Melbourne, Australia. Luisa mentions that we all have strengths and weaknesses, the action we take to develop our strengths and reduce our weaknesses will determine our outcomes and success and its soooooooo true!!!!!! She says people who deliberately PUSH the boundaries and continually reach out of their comfort zone SEE the fruits of their labour in where they go and what they achieve…..

Luisa is beautiful in saying YOU ARE AMAZING! and CAPABLE

“You are strongest when you are at your most authentic, and the best version of yourself is a true blessing.”

2. DISTRACTION

“We can take control of both forms of distraction to become more productive and life live with more peace and clarity.”

At the moment this one quote is speaking to me, because like I said I think a ZILLION things a day….

“Our brain is SO AMAZINGLY complex and SHARP that we could be thinking about one thing, doing another, saying something else entirely and still have a completely different conversation going on in our subconscious…….. but it can leave us tired, stressed and somewhat in effective.”

I love how she talks about VISION….. you have to write it down, hang it up somewhere noticeable, so you can read it and remind yourself everyday…..

I am just going to go STRAIGHT to Point 3 – Lack of planning

PLANNING is the key against distraction…..

You have to be a goal – setter in 90 day blocks, and have MONTHLY, WEEKLY and DAILY planners that work BEST….

Also,

  • FOCUS

Energy FLOWS where your focus goes……

In the morning we are refreshed, full of energy and usually thats the time where you are most focused. 

  • Once our mind decides something is true, its main priority is to find other evidence to back it up, even if it must delete, distort, generalise, or fabricate the information.

She talks a lot about relationships in this chapter and it is very healthy to get a fresh perspective on whats important. I love how she talks about personal growth, opportunity and freedom. Heres a few quotes I absolutely LOVE from the book!

“It’s a benefit to take time, stop and be more self-aware, to identify what we are focusing on. As we learn to address these thoughts and shape our perspective, we will experience freedom and be EMPOWERED to encounter the things we really want.

“Words become thoughts, thoughts become feelings, and feelings often lead to the actions we take. “

“Words spoken to use or that we hear in our heads create our thoughts and thoughts help to create belief systems. Thoughts also create sensations in our body. This is “cognitive fusion.”

Luisa is quite right about the mind never stopping. it is like unlimited Netflix, and podcasts running all day, every day, even while you sleep – this is sooooooo true!!!! haha! that is meeeee!!! Your mind is comparing, judging, assessing, criticising, fantasising, and systematically sorting thoughts constantly.

A study shows that that average person can have up to 60,000 thoughts per day, I thought it was 3 million haha but studies are constantly updating! 80% are negative, and 95% are the same repetitive thoughts as the day before – Quality of life rests on that of our internal and external communication.

We are what we repeatedly do – Aristotle 

Remind yourself of 3 things you do well, giving yourself that grace needed for growth. You will be surprised and see something FLOURISH!

“Life is gift to be enjoyed, not endured, unwrap it and enjoy your day!”

She reminded me of an old quote that I completely forgot about!

“God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can and the wisdom to know the difference.”

It is nice to have the mantra I will make the world around me a better place…. this is hard for some to do but I LOVE that Luisa said Bring your warmth and joy and set it to tropical!!!!

and especially whats even more important is saying “I will use my experiences positive or negative to being HOPE!!!!!!

My actions and attitudes will reflect my deepest convictions

Emotions will not be the deciding factor in my choices

I have so much to be grateful for

I choose to move forward with STRENGTH today

I am a person of good character and integrity

I can develop any skills needed to complete my work with excellence

I will be kind to people today especially those who are unkind to me

I can overcome any challenge with confidence nd perseverance

I am becoming healthier and stronger EVERY DAY

I have complete control of my mind

I will live more openly with every encounter today

I am loved by God unconditionally just the way I am

I will aspire to live as my greatest self and measure myself with grace

I will uplift and encourage and believe in those around me

I will live my life purposely to reflect the divine in me

I will remind myself of the progress I have made

This last one really spoke to me as I felt I still haven’t progressed even after doing AMAZING things with my life the past year, like my travels throughout England/London and working in various industries in 6 different suburbs of Melbourne, Australia and then moving around Australia quite a bit!!!!!!!

We can finish it off with You are INCREDIBLE and DESTINED for greatness – Yes you!!!! Thanks Luisa!!!

Chapters 4 to 6 are my three favourite chapters as

I love action plans

the belief in Self Care

and

Create and sustain your dream life…. its all about VISION……

Just like she says When we embrace change, we enable GROWTH!!!!!!!

growth is just about ANYTHING!

from career to family to success to emotional maturity just like she says We go through sooooo may different life experiences….. becoming an agent of change for yourself and the world is what SUCCESS is!!!!!!

We need a strong mindset and conviction too!!!!!!!

She talks about 1. Fear of failure, 2. lack of trust, and how to define your future and not ANALYSE the past!

and elaborates on taking the TIME to DREAM!!!!!!!

by learning what matters to you the most and then what brings you JOY every day!!!!

My favourite one is heart is all about gaining clarity

especially when heart is all about what you love

and what you dont and what gives you joy?

and makes you most happy!!!!!!!

What makes your heart SING!!!!!!!???????

SUCCESSFUL people ALWAYS LOVE what they do

and know what they value most and its VERY true…….

Your heart also helps you recognise your talents……. and Luisa is SPOT ON!

We all have a gift from God we just need to recognise them, focus on them and then strengthen them…….

I believe if you buy this book it will help you with achieving your personal goals and also your business goals. I don’t have a business per say but starting this blog really opened up a creative outlet my mind especially when I went from Cosmpolitan city to country town, a blog ca be treated as a business as it is something you can be passionate about even if you are not earning money from it, whats education? whats money!? whats achievements? You will NEVER get it if you are not passionate about DRIVEN like someone who is like Luisa who wrote this book, and I am inspired by peope like this when I see it because it make me MORE DRIVEN myself EVERY DAY!!!!!!!

Luisa gives clarity through asking personal questions and she asks what are you passionate about? I was thinking about passion BEFORE I read that question and it is something EVERY person needs to ask themselves on this planet EVERY day…….

Your heart will reveal your purpose and I love how she talks about living the life you truly WANT to LIVE!!!!!!! hearts desires is a big one, and it was on my heart to go to England and it FINALLY happened! When you dream BIG it CAN happen, darling!!!!!!! EXCITEMENT IS PASSION

I truly love how she asks questions they just pop out oat me especially what do you spend your time thinking about that you haven’t yet pursued? At the moment it is New York!!!!!!!

The REWIRE YOUR THINKING section is BRILLIANT!!!!!!!

my favourite bit is with every experience moment to Moment, we are learning evaluating and categorizing and it is soooooo true!!!!! If you want to learn more about creating an action plan to thrive this is the chapter for you and then you can do a Character Inventory She asks 6 questions. I won’t write them all out but one example is what are your thoughts towards your physical and mental health?

Venturing out is also a great section to read, it talks about procrastinating learning and growing! Believing in yourself and potential of your life and growth. And most of all “confidence”

Confidence is a skill.……

Confidence is a skill that develops naturally over time as you practice and gain experience.

The more you develop a skill and become proficient in it aka cooking sewing craft exercise and fitness (daily skills) the less work your brain needs to do…….

A skill can become automatic & you don’t need to think about what you’re doing as when your brain strengthens over time it is really learning that skill that you previously did…. I am like this with typing as it is my absolute strength and I have done singing and piano and drama and when I go to do it again it all comes back to me even with strength training it is like “muscle memory”…….

Luisa is truly inspirational in the way that she writes…..

She knows how to teach us practical habits and especially knowing what you’re morning routine will be will set the tone for the rest of the day! And she is right it is the most valueable disciplines.

I truly felt empowered by “when you have a healthy self-confidence about what you are capable of and the power of discipline you will want to become even more disciplined.”

I also am all for exercise that is good for mental health. I was so into fitness and health in my early twenties and I was at the gym regularly doing strength training and even cardio to let go of any stress that got in the way of life. Like she says

“Exercise improves concentration and cognitive function and also relieves anxiety and depression.”

I absolutely love chapter 5 her words leap of the pages with such truth behind it.

SELF CARE

Last but not least one of my FAVOURITE topics on EARTH!

Like Luisa says “Self care is a MUST”….. to make sure we live our best life.

When it came to healthy self talk there were 7 points. It’s not just about physical and spiritual health but my two favourite points out of the seven were hobbies and personal development. For personal development there were three questions and one that stuck out for me was Are you evaluating yourself and actively seeking out new ways to grow?

What is so true is that without hobbies or interests we can become emotionally stagnant and lose our individuality. This is SO TRUE!!! And we all hold something valuable whether it’s in our hearts 💕 or something you want to give and offer to the world whether it’s a gift or talent you want to use or just a simple encouragement to get someone through their day.

The last paragraph of the book REALLY spoke to me and I wanted to HIGHLIGHT it!

I will leave you with the last paragraph of the book

She wrote:

“People ask me all the time, Luisa how do you stay so enthusiastic?”

Volunteering is one of my secrets. It’s a fact that serving others has physical and mental health benefits including gaining new skills and knows. It even boosts job and career prospects brings a sense of achievement develops personal character and increases self esteem. When you contribute where there is nothing to gain you will enjoy the benefits and the chance to connect with and better understand your community.

For me this stands out and speaks to me with absolute TRUTH as I have volunteered at two libraries in Western Australia and volunteer led at Save the Children in Scarborough- it does open job prospects when you volunteer and just gives GROWTH in so many areas. Take to heart this last paragraph as I believe it will help you and if you get the book at AMAZON on Kindle for $7.34 on http://www.amazon.com.au/SOUL-PURPOSE-Design-Confidence-Purpose-ebook

Or the paperback for $39.16 on https://www.amazon.com.au/Soul-Purpose-Design-Regain-Confidence/dp/1073627314

EMMALISA’S TRAVELS IN ENGLAND – JULY 2018

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I have probably raved one about my trip to England just a TAD too many times!!!! As soon as I arrived in London it TOTES felt surreal!!!!! I was there but felt like a million things were going through my mind. I had FINALLLLY reaches my DREAM DESTINATION!!!!!! 😍😍😍😍😍😍

I loved everything about that country and the things we did. As soon as we arrived to Hyde Park Gate Hotel it was ABSOLUTELY relaxing and the mornings were FRESH!!!!

Continue reading “EMMALISA’S TRAVELS IN ENGLAND – JULY 2018”

A little bit of Althorp


One of The first things I bought this year was a stunning hardback cover of Althorp: The story of an English House by Charles Spencer.

What a great addition to my bookcase and I have actually put it on my desk. This is an absolute treasure for my book collection.

It is just OH SO GORGEOUS 😍😍😍

Charles Spencer 9th Earl inherited the estate as his grandfather’s eightieth birthday was in 1972 and the local paper in Northamptonshire took a photograph of him, Charles and his father.

Charles Spencer was based in Sandringham and Althorp was known as very Edwardian. It was a 2 hour drive from from Park House and Charles articulates that it is the most English of settings.

“His memory of those days included his grandmothers sitting room with beautiful, deep blue, hand painted frescoes and formal furniture that reflected her cool and natural aristocracy; a slice of sophistication in an otherwise stolidly traditional English stately home.”

See above.

His grandfather dominated the rest of Althorp.

And pores over the family records in the Muniment Room. Medieval household accounts, letters from leading Jacobean political figures and reminiscences of Victorian house parties all stored together.

The Muniment room is now gone in which it’s contents with the British Library much of it waiting to be catalogued.

One interesting fact is his father had to sell the great Holbein of Henry VIII to finance his education. He sold it for 10K pounds.

During his childhood his sisters and him rarely stayed the night at Althorp when his grandfather was there. If they did it was in the night nursery.

This is the Wooten Hall, painted by the early eighteenth century artist John Wooten.

Wooton painted all these works in 1733, in his studio in Marylebone, London, before they were transported to their permanent home at Althorp.

He was known as the best painter of horses in England.

This is the picture gallery. Chairs by the fireplace, bookcases against the wall, side tables positioned near the wall to give it a finish.

“In 1508 Althorp was bought by John Spencer for only 800 pounds and the house that you see today had its heart constructed as the family’s Northhamptonshire base.”

It had actually been catalogued in the Doomsday Book as “Olletorpe” which meant Ollas Thorpe. Ola was a Saxon Lord. And interestingly “Thorp” is a Scandinavian name. His grandfather called it “Awl Trupp”.

When Charles inherited the estate in 1992, the BBC Pronunciation Department sent him a letter saying that they would like to see it rever to the correct pronunciation. And gave him strict guidelines on how it should be pronounced.

It was called Antwerp by an American presenter and he believed Diana would have enjoyed that…..

CHARLES II BY MARY BEALE

The portrait of another monarch was also in the Picture Gallery – Lady Jane Grey the nine days queen painted by Lucas de Heere.

It is still at Althorpe.but in a different room. And shows

Lady Jane Grey at the age of 16 a year before she was executed sitting in a room at Broadgate, her family’s home In Leicestershire. Reading a religious text pretty in a red velvet dress. She showed her devotion to Protestantism whilst the Catholics were the ones involved in her execution.

This is a Tudor lady where they would like to “use the length of the gallery for exercise.”

They re call the Picture Gallery as being ‘a fine room for walking about in” – they always had breakfast there.

In 1695 the neighbouring nobility and gentry gathered to dine there in which they had come to pay their respects to William III, as he in turn had come to secure the support of Robert Spencer, Second Earl of Sunderland and master of Althorp.

 

In the History of England they quote:

 

“It seems strange that William should, in the course of what was really a canvassing tour honoured with such a mark of favour a man so generally distrusted and hated as Sunderland. but the people were determined to be pleased All Northamptonshire crowded to kiss that royal hand in that fine taller which had been embellished by the pencil of Vandyck and made classic by the muse f Waller, and the Earl tried to conciliate his neighbours by feasting them at eight tables all blazing with plate.”

299 years later, Charles Spencer give a dinner party in that same room for his 30th birthday.

In the Picture Gallery, between the Windsor Beauties and War and Peace is a tiny door cut neatly into the oak panelling. Harley ever used but leads to a staircase that joined the Pink Suite, a guest bedroom to the rest of the house. His great aunt who was Margaret Douglas-Home was the youngest of six children who lived at Althorn from 1910 onwards.

What I found out very interesting is this story:

 

The day Charles had guests over he was going through some leather bound volumes that were in relation to the house. One of them were a book of press cuttings from the mid nineteenth century kept by his great great grandfather Frederick, 4th Earl Spencer.

this is what the article said:

“One morning, the Dean came down to breakfast with the family and rather frostily complained to the then earl that in future he would prefer it if he was left undisturbed after retiring for the night. My ancestor asked the dean to expand. It transpired that the Dean had been awoken by a figure dressed as a groom entering his room, holding candles, who had gone round the bed, checking all the candles, who had gone round the bed, checking all the candles were properly snuffed out.”

The exact description of the ‘groom was agreed upon that it was the ghost of the previous earls favourite servant – whose job was to go round all the rooms at night, after everyone had retired, to check that no flame was still burning.

After Charles read it, he didn’t think anything of it, until one Sunday evening, he was helping his guests down with the luggage of the exact same room, The Oak Bedroom, when a lady said to him “I swear that someone came in here last night.” Now Charles didn’t think anything of it because he just thought it was someone going to bed late, or a guest having trouble looking for their room.

The lady continued to say “And the strange thing is he was holding a candelabrum and wearing an old uniform – a cloak.”

He said back to her well I have had a broad range of guests here at Althorn but no one dressing up like that!

So Charles decided to run up to the housekeeper who was cataloguing articles for a new museum she had created showing off some of the more historic items that had been put in storage rooms. He was about to take down a grooms cloak when instead he actually grabbed a footman uniform, and he thought ‘if she is lying, this will catch her out.’ He raced back down stairs and shows the clothing to the guest, Almost…. she said, but it was longer – more like this…. and she described in DETAIL the clothing of ‘an early nineteenth century Spencer groom.’

 

 

With the Oak Bedroom it was where John Spencer the first earl married his sweetheart in secret. This is another story that caught my eye, as

John Spencer’s father was called John, who was the favourite grandson of the Duchess of Marlborough, she had a fortune so large that she actually lent money to the Bank of England.

This financial power, the quick tempered matriarch was determined was not to go to her grandson the third duke of Marlborough but to his younger brother John. who died young through “over-abundance”.

Horace Walpole was slightly more sharp witted in pin pointing the main causes of his early demise, when writing to Sir Horace Mann in 1746; Jack Spencer, old Marlborough’s grandson and heir is dead, at the age of 37 and in possession of 30K pounds a year merely because he would not be abridged of thee invaluable blessings of an English subject.

The 12 year old John was left beneficiary to the GREATEST inheritance in the kingdom, spending it on diamond buckled shoes and building Spencer House.

So the only pressure on a young man with this amount of wealth was to marry, in order to ensure the money stayed in the direct family line.

When it came close to his 21st birthday Georgiana Poyntz was to be the chose one. She wasn’t an heiress. Georgiana was SO in love with him, according to a letter she wrote to her friends, and saying he was ‘handsomer than an angel’. She stayed at Althorp for the summer and they got engaged. They were to be wed, and John and Georgiana had planned to marry at Althorn on Christmas Day with nobody else knowing. Th wedding party convened in the Oak Bedroom which was occupied by Johns mother and step father. Those present were Georgiana’s  mother, brother and a Mr Holloway who conducted the service.

After the service they went back to the party that was going on in ALTHORP as though nothing had happened, in this kept hidden a secret marriage ended a famous happy one!

 

 

In 1688 a lady called Evelyn had this to say about Althorp.

“The house/palace is a noble uniform pile in form of a half H, built f brick and freestone, the hall is well, the staircase is excellent, the rooms of state, galleries, offices, and furniture such as may become a great prince. It is situated in the midst of a garden, exquisitely planted and kept and all this in a park walled in with hewn stone, planted with rows and walks of trees, canals, and fish ponds and stored with game.” Spencer, C, Althorp: The story of an English House, 1998, London, Penguin Group.

This account relate to the time of Second Earl of Sunderland Robert Spencer. This was the period where he was secretary of state to Charles II, James II and William III.

 

 

Charles believes the most magical painting to be in Althorp would have to be in the Picture Gallery which is called “War and Peace” by Gottfried Schalken.

 

 

In 1772 there was an announcement needing laborours to help repair the house. the ceiling in the library collapsed the next year and the floor was unsafe needing to put new ones in. George John got in contact with a Henry Holland who actually assisted with the construction of Battersea Bridge for the First Earl Spencer. He was a well known architect in London.

Holland started in 1785 repairing Spencer House and then was asked to design something to save Althorp/Spencer House. George Johns wife was a Lady Lavinia Bingham as shown above wasn’t exactly happy with Holland and didn’t like how much it was costing.

Althorp was transformed into a Georgian mansion and was classically beautiful.

Holland added a Library, Billiard Room and South Drawing Room. This was the beginning of the century in which the Library would be the dominant room at Althorp.

The library tells the story of the Spencer’s in the eighteenth and nineteenth century more eloquently.

Like me, there was one ancestor that was an avid collector of books.

And collecting early English Literature.

John, First Earl Spencer added to the family collection by buying the whole entire library of Doctor William George who was a headmaster at Eton College. Primarily, English.

George John transformed the Spencer library into the greatest private collection of books in England.

George had an interest in English Literature at a very early age.

As you can see in the picture the library room was filled with books full to the ceiling!

What I am most fascinated about was that in the final decade of his life, George John, ordered a copy of every single book published in England. ASTOUNDING!!!!!

Here we find, Frederick the fourth spencer inheriting Althorp who was a Naval Officer.

The Red Earl – John Fifth Earl Spencer was married to Charlotte Seymour, who was a great beauty and also called Spencers Fairy Queen.

Here we have the great dining room which was added to the side of the house, It is actually a copy of the ballroom in Buckingham Palace. and was created by MacVicar Anderson.

Sarah, Duchess of Marlborough had a family bible, which lists every member of the Spencer family. Naming their date of birth, place of christening, godparents, date and place of marriage, spouse, children and date of death.

but the library was sadly sold.

 

This is the Marlborough Room which was transformed int a dining room.

and this is one of the fireplaces taken from Spencer House to Altho to escape the Blitz.

Religious paintings were sold in large numbers under Raine’s management in the 1980’s.

and they had a painting which included a scene from Exodus – Moses in the bullrushes.

 

Holland’s Long Library, transformed during Raine’s redecorating spree in the 1980’s

and this is the South Drawing Room in the 1980’s, gilded to within an inch of its life.

The chapel, which was transformed in the 80’s into a humble junk room, was restored to its proper function. Full of religious paintings, the french grey of the walls was washed down rather than re painted, and the beautiful stained glass windows were bought from Wormleighton Manor in the nineteenth century.

This is a stained glass window in the Chapel, the armorial glass dates from 1588 and came Wormleighton Manor, the original Spencer family residence.

The Long library became Charles Spencer’s study andante had a busy lozenge carpet rolled back and natural colour restored, with the leather bound volumes showing their richly coloured spines off against a crisp, neutral backdrop, with sweeping views of the Deer Park.

Here is one of the pair of torcheres from Spencer House that now reside either side of the fireplace in the Saloon.

Hollands love of white was the authentic and practical solution. It had a candelabra, the room recaptured its majestic simplicity, the family portraits, an assortment of royal, and here is the Painters Passage. The moving of the china has freed of the area of where the china used to be, showing here that the Painters Passage is now displaying self-portraits. The most fascinating art forms.

There was a Sunderland Room and right next to it was The Marlborough Room, which here (above picture) is the drawing room.

They actually wanted to change it into a dining room.

The most notable collection of portraits was  picture of Georgiana, Countess Spencer with her daughter Lady Georgiana who was the Duchess of Devonshire, was done by Sir Joshua Reynolds, who actually was a close friend of the family.

These portraits of Lady Anne, and Lady Lavinia are the very essence of eighteenth – century portraiture which complements the house in all its majestic glory.

 

 

In modern times, Princess Diana who was born into the Spencer family, was the youngest daughter of Viscount and Viscountess Althorp, but she grew up in Sandringham. After her father inherited the title “Earl Spencer”, she then became “Lady Diana Spencer”. Growing up I didn’t know who she was and honestly didn’t know who she was till the day she died. I will aways remember that she passed away in 1997 the same year as my granny, so thats been etched in my mind for a while.

The last chapter of this book primarily focuses on Princes Diana and the legacy that she left behind. I highly recommend this book for your collection and you can find it on AMAZON for $51.67 or on the World of Books Australia website for $11.49 how cheap!!!!

 

 

I hope you liked reading, as I used some of the words from the book for those that don’t want to buy it, but want to catch a glimpse for free.

It is an absolute stunning picture book, and really dives into the life of the Spencers. I want to buy The Spencer Family: A Personal History of an English Family next time!!! It is $23.86, and It is on my book list!!!!

 

Love

 

Emmalisa

 

xx

Historical Fiction Writing with Universal Class – with City of Joondalup – Whitfords Library


INTRODUCTION

What Is Historical Fiction?

I thought I would first show the definition of Historical Fiction to pinpoint what we are looking at exactly.

Historical, adj. 1. Of, relating to, or of the character of history. 2. Based on or concerned with events in history.

Fiction, n. 4.a. A literary work whose content is produced by the imagination and is not necessarily based on fact. b. The category of literature comprising works of this kind, including novels, short stories, and plays.

Writing historical fiction is simply writing a story that is set in the past which is usually during a significant time period. For example, the Victorian Period is the period during Queen Victoria’s reign. I find this period particularly interesting and a favourite.

The main thing that I will learn in this course is to do research to come up with the correct setting based on facts. It can also include real people but does not necessarily have to.

When You are writing fiction, it is very important to do your homework so that you can really pinpoint the mannerisms, costumes, conditions,  etc, in order to make the novel authentic. In fact, they also say that historical fiction novels can take years to write because of the amount of research you have to do when writing.

Historical writing includes historical figures placed in imaginary situations

Fictional characters placed in actual, factual historical periods of time or situations

(for example, you can place your fictional character “Alexandra” in Napoleon’s invasion of Russia in 1812); or you can have variations of both.

For example, you could place historical figures in settings they have been proven to have been in or fictional characters in fictional settings in a real period of history.

To recap, historical fiction is writing that is fictional but in which elements from history play the main roles.

When you choose to write historical fiction, you are doing two things at once – you are both the historian AND the storyteller. You are going to tell your readers what happened at the time and what it felt like.

We are going to explore the genre.

We will discuss the various subgenres, the types of characters and settings you may want to explore, character motivations, conflict, plot, plot mapping, editing, and pacing, plus agents, queries, and so much more.

You will walk away at the end of this course feeling as though you know exactly what you want to write and exactly how to write it.

I have submitted my Introduction online and written what book I want to write and then did a multiple choice exam at the end.

You may have to be a member of the City of Joondalup library to access the course.

It is under Online Resources in the Spydus catalogue.

Xx

Emmalisa

Note: 📝 This is through onlineclasses.com

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Oh! How I want to do Journalism!

I will possibly do a Book Review of The Governess Game in the near future! As that is the featured photo on my post!

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