Tips for Thriving as You Adapt to Life During and After COVID-19


The COVID-19 pandemic has affected people around the world. Even with restrictions lifting, many individuals continue to struggle. The United Nations has even warned of a global mental health crisis as a result. Whether you are getting back out into the world or prefer to seek comfort in your own home, it’s important to take care of yourself during this time.

Making your mental and physical health a priority is paramount. That said, you aren’t in this alone. There are many tools and resources available to help you, even if you aren’t ready to leave the house yet. Read on for tips on how you can ensure you are looking and feeling your best as you adapt to life during and after COVID-19.

Revamp your home.

Your home should be a place that brings you comfort and makes you feel safe. Clearing bad energy from your home will create a more positive space. If you notice you’re feeling anxious or your family is arguing more than usual, it’s time for a deep cleanse. Open the windows to let in light and air, use a sage stick throughout the house, and get rid of clutter.

Pay special attention to the bedroom. Creating a relaxing environment here ensures you get the rest you need at night. According to The Age, as many as 40% of Australians don’t get sufficient sleep. Aim for at least seven hours per night. To make sure this is the case, eliminate extra light and noise from the room. You can buy blackout curtains and a white noise machine, for example.

Set new fitness goals.

If you’re still having trouble sleeping, ramp up your exercise habits. Physical activity will help ensure you are tired when the time comes to catch your zzzs. Exercise also promotes mental and physical health and is known to combat depression and anxiety. Setting goals can motivate you to work out harder. If you currently run one mile every day, for example, aim to increase it to two.

Look good for yourself.

If you’ve been spending more time in sweatpants and less time wearing makeup, you may be feeling the blahs. When you aren’t socializing as much or dealing with work-from-home stress, it can be hard to motivate yourself to put on a nice outfit or do your makeup. However, finding something stylish to wear, fixing your hair and trying a new eyeliner technique can make a big difference in your mood. To make sure you follow through, splurge on the mascara or eyeshadow collection you’ve been eyeing, or sign up for a new beauty subscription box. That little bit of pampering will go a long way

Tackle your anxiety head-on.

Anxiety isn’t just unpleasant mentally. It also impacts the body negatively. Anxiety can lead to headaches, a racing heart, difficulty breathing, upset stomach, and loss of libido. Be proactive about keeping anxiety at bay. Exercise is one way to help. You should also avoid triggers like alcohol and caffeine, which tend to worsen anxiety symptoms.

If you are still struggling, don’t be afraid to seek professional help. Mindfulness health and wellness coaching is one option. Mindfulness combats anxiety by forcing you to focus on the present moment. You can learn practical approaches to avoiding anxiety, like breathing exercises and meditation.

Find ways to socialize.

Another important step to combatting anxiety is to socialize. Seeing friends and family reminds you that you are supported and loved. Socializing is also proven to have concrete health benefits. It can lower your risk of dementia, for example, and even contribute to a longer life. Even if you are still socially distancing, find ways to connect—for example, via video calls.

With these tips, you can start paving the path to a healthier and happier life. The COVID-19 experience has been difficult but if you prioritize self-care, you will find yourself thriving. This guide is a good starting point. And for more resources and inspiration to help you with the struggle, visit Exquisite Emmalisa today.

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Brand Collaboration with TOUCHBeauty


I recently received an email from a Brand Collaborator at TOUCHBeauty, the lovely Jenna sent me an email and I was beyond excited to be able to do a review of one of their products at TOUCHBeauty.

I was eagerly awaiting for the package to arrive, and it came on Monday the 26th October which was a bonus to start the week off with!

This product is called the UltraSonic Scrub Device which is also an exfoliating skin scrubber as seen on the website.

This Ultrasonic Scrub Device was easy to put on charge. It came with a cord, and then you place the device on top of a silver spoon looking object where it can sit on top whilst charging. It comes with an Instruction Manual, which tells you how to do things properly, and before using the device you have to ensure that your skin is cleansed thoroughly, and that all makeup is off.

I did this before trying, and then I double tapped the Double Touch Switch button once I felt it was charged enough although it says to charge the device for four hours.

The device came in excellent condition, and it was absolutely clean, and the packaging was all boxed up nicely as you can see in the pictures. So, presentation and appearance was in highly good physical condition.

I then unpacked both objects as seen in the picture, and then plugged in the cord, once charged I double tapped the button, and slid the Intensity Touch Switch bar up with my finger slightly, starting up with the first level,

I tried using the product with that level, but then decided to increase the intensity level. It felt warm against the skin, and moisturised almost.

Using the appliance you have to place the Ultrasonic Spatula blade on the skin at a 30 degree angle and then move slowly on the skin.

Whilst doing this I could feel it working against the skin and you have to massage it against the skin.

It deeply is exfoliates the skin and as said on the website it produces up to 26,000 HZ ultrasonic vibrations per second to cleanse the skin without hurting or damaging the skin.

It also is good for blackhead removal when you put the spatula on it with a light pressure, it clears them using high frequency vibrations to get rid of the sebum and debris out of the pores.

I received this product from TOUCHBeauty in which they pride themselves on having a professional attitude towards the beauty and personal care devices industry. They have twenty years experience in the industry and focus on innovation and high quality products.

Here are 5 points on the device/product:

1. Utilizing cutting-edge technology and award-winning design concepts to cleanse, exfoliate, and massage the skin. It produces up to 26,000 ultrasonica vibration per second to deeply cleanse and exfoliate the skin without hurt or demaging the skin. Note: Please make sure that you wet the face with water before the use.2. It has 2 main functions and features 5 intensity levels adjusting to different skincare needs. You can choose the intensity level that best fits your skin.
3. The pointy side is the cleaning function. Try using it after removing your makeup, and you will see how much makeup residues were hidden on your pores.
4. The flat side is the message function. Boost the absorption of your favorite serum or cream, the vibration will increase blood circulation while promoting relaxation.
5. Wireless charging system and cordless operation. It has a charging dock to charge the device and does not require a cable. Convenient touch operation. If you have longer nails, this will make your life so much easier.

Code: EMMALISA (30% off for the Ultrasonic Exfoliating Skin Scrubber)Shop link: https://touchbeauty.com/discount/EMMALISA?redirect=%2Fproducts%2Fultrasonic-scrub-device

Exquisite Emmalisa

In collaboration with TOUCHBeauty

Xx

You can follow them on social media here:

WEBSITE: www.touchbeauty.com

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What to Say and How to Do: Writing Victorian Historical Fiction


By Sarah A. Chrisman

A Book Is A Time Machine

            A book is the best and cheapest time machine you will ever buy.  As a writer of books about the Victorian era I often think of myself as a tour guide to another time.  When showing my fellow travellers the delights of a foreign time, I always remember the importance of not only knowing the terrain through which we’re travelling, but of being respectful of its people as well.  Something I was once told about understanding modern cultures is just as applicable to understanding cultures defined by time rather than mere distance: on my first day of French class at university the professor opened her very first lecture by telling us, “French people do not say things in French because they mean them in English and just don’t know any better.  French people say things in French because they mean them in French!”  So, too, with people of different eras.  They were not modern people acting certain ways and doing certain things because they didn’t know any better: they were members of a vibrant culture of time.  If you are going to bring strangers into their world to walk amongst them, you must first understand them.

Choose A Destination

            Be very clear with yourself about the time and place that form your setting.  The Victorian era was very long and covered an immense diversity of places.  Tombstone, Arizona, of the 1880’s was very different from London of the same time, and Paris of 1900 was a radically different city from Paris of 1848.  A specific choice of where and when you’re going is the first step towards getting there.

Research, Research, Research!

            I draft all my manuscripts by hand – a number of interesting studies have shown that the creative process works differently when writing by hand than when typing.  Next to my desk is a wicker basket full of notebooks, and each one is devoted to a different book in my series.  In the back of each of these is a reading list I’ve compiled for myself of materials I want to either read or revisit before I start writing that particular story.  For example, I just finished a novel about a reporter in the American Pacific Northwest in 1889.  Looking at the reading list I assigned myself before I started writing his story, I see the memoirs of a 19th-century journalist; four Victorian-era style guides and two period articles on the subject of how to write for the press; five detective memoirs from the time; two 19th-century novels about journalists; a journalist’s trade magazine; and a number of books, magazines and newspaper articles related to my hero’s personality and the historic events through which he’s living – and this is all just background!  As I write a book, I’m constantly doing still more research and delving deeper into my characters’ world and their motivations.

            How do I put together these reading lists?  By constantly reading everything I can about the Victorian era and compulsively taking notes on them.  When I see a quote, fact or witticism that seems like it might fit into a particular story, I’ll jot it down in the notes I’m compiling for that story.  When I come across things that don’t fit with any planned project but are nonetheless worth remembering, I add them to my latest commonplace book.  This may seem like a slow and haphazard way to go about things at first, but once you’ve been at it a while you’ll be amazed at how much information you’ve compiled and how much more you’ve learned than a simple keyword search could have taught you.

Get Your Facts From the Original Sources

            Remember what I said about books being time machines and authors being tour guides?  Your research is your tour guide training, and it’s best to get that training first hand.  In other words, read materials actually written in the Victorian era, not just modern things about the Victorian era.  Think about it this way: if you landed a job giving tours of Paris, wouldn’t you rather learn your routes from a native-born Parisian than from someone who’d never been there? 

            So many written materials of all sorts were produced during the Victorian era there’s really no excuse for not reading some of them.  Try to read the same materials your characters would have been reading.  If you’re writing about a middle-class American woman, read Godey’s magazine or period issues of Good Housekeeping.  If you’re writing humor about late 19th-century London, read the hilarious novel, The Diary of a Nobody.  If your hero’s a doctor read The Lancet; for a nurse read the works of Florence Nightingale.  

            You can buy a wide variety of antique or reprinted books through websites like Abebooks.com and eBay.  Digital copies of many hard-to-find works can be downloaded for free by using the Google Books Advanced Search function, and you can then print these out and bind them into a hardcopy format.  Don’t forget about period newspapers, too!  Many communities operate digital archives of their periodicals, and these can be absolute goldmines for knowing exactly what was really happening at the precise time of your story.

            My favorite resources of all are diaries written in the 19th-century.  A surprising number of these have been published – I highly recommend Maud: The Illustrated Diary of a Victorian Woman.  Large archives often contain original diaries from people associated with their institutions; and if you’re very lucky you can sometimes find original diaries for sale from rare book dealers or even on eBay.  There is no more intimate connection to an era than reading the hand-written diary of someone who lived through it.

Some Travel Tips

            Before I send you along on your journeys, oh fellow tour guides, here are a few tips for your journey:

            —Avoid Anachronisms.  I don’t need to tell you not to give your Victorian heroine a cell phone.  Be aware, though, that it’s just as inappropriate to give her modern opinions and motivations.  Unless you are literally writing a time travel story DON’T give it a heroine who reads like she just stepped out of the twenty-first century.  Respect the world and culture you’re depicting by learning as much about it as you possibly can, then write characters appropriate to that world.

            —Don’t Stereotype.  Don’t insert modern characters into historical settings, but don’t fill those settings with flat clichés, either.  Remember that you are painting a picture of a diverse community where every individual has a complex personal history.  Flesh out those backgrounds for yourself and you can make the world come to life for your readers.

            —A Couple Basic Guide Books.  Every work of historical fiction has an entire library behind it, but there are a couple types of books that are useful to every writer of the genre.  You’ll want a period style guide.  My personal favorite is Wolstan Dixey’s The Trade of Authorship from 1889.  (Give particular attention to pp. 74-91, “The Trade”.)  Familiarizing yourself with writing advice from the time will help you settle into a style of your own that feels natural for the period.  Besides this writing guide, you’ll also benefit from a period etiquette guide.  I’m a fan of Hill’s Manual of Social and Business Forms.  This will give you a succinct overview of advice from the time and help you (and your characters) avoid common pitfalls.

Bon Voyage!            Your readers are depending on you to bring them to another time and place.  Be worthy of their trust by learning as much as you can about their destination and presenting it in a respectful and realistic way.  Pleasant journeys and happy trails! 

— 

“Books are the windows through which the mind looks out.” —Anonymous, Zion’s Home Monthly, January 15, 1889. p. 197.

Written by Sarah A. Chrisman

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Make Up Blog COMPETITION


Makeupblog.com is hosting a competition for girls all over the world where you can enter online and be in the draw for some FABULOUS prizes.

CLICK HERE TO ENTER

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The MakeupBlogs.com Top Looks of 2020 Contest

Is your phone full of great makeup selfies? We invite you to submit a photo capturing your best look in any of the categories below. The contest will be judged by MakeupBlog’s expert team of makeup lovers.

5 categories

Smokey Eyes

Cat/Winged eyeliner

Glam

Editorial

“No Makeup” Makeup Look

5 prizes

$1,000 in prizes!

If you go to the Makeup Blog website, you can follow them on Facebook, Twitter, and even Share your looks to Pinterest! You can enter any of these categories, and even use a photo you may have taken from a previous photo shoot you have done in the past or something. Whether its glam, or a natural look! This can also give you inspiration to shoot a new look if you want, whether its professional and/or just with your own iPhone camera. You can do your makeup yourself or get someone to do it for you for fun! If you do a smokey eye look we will need you to do a full face shot also. If you do not know what an editorial look is, for example, it can be very artistic and a runway style as featured on the website. For more information head on over to the website makeupblogs.com and you will find what to do to enter the competition! Requirements are listed as you have to be 18 years old or over, the photo has to be of yourself and no one else, and you MUST own the rights to your photo. Deadline for this competition is 1st February 2021! I hope you have fun with inspiration for creating a look for the competition!

Thankyou to MakeupBlog for collaborating with ExquisiteEmmalisa.

Exquisite Emmalisa

Historical Fiction Writing with Universal Class LESSON 2

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ELEMENTS OF HISTORICAL FICTION

Every genre of fiction has its own special elements. The elements of historical fiction are varied. They include characterisation, setting, plot themes, and specific styles and tones.

Characterization

Let’s start with characters.

Your characters may be real people that have lived in the past.

Oftentimes, these people are famous but, of course, they do not have to be. You may do research on someone who lived in the past and shape your story around them in order to give more notice to that character. They may be someone you feel should be noted for deeds accomplished but so far, is a bit overlooked, historically speaking.



A recent novel titled Alice I Have Been by Melanie Benjamin is a good example of this. This is a historical fiction novel that tells the story of the girl who would later become Alice in Lewis Carroll’s, Alice in Wonderland. Additionally, it tells a bit of the story behind Lewis Carroll.

The story is historical fiction because we could never be privy to all of these conversations and thoughts, but for all the research the author did, we have an excellent idea of how things were and what happened.

Another option is to create completely original characters who are not based on anyone who has ever lived. If you do this, in order to make it historical fiction, you must set your characters in a historical period. Choose a specific date or event and then do as much research as you can to bring the story to life.



One thing that happens in historical fiction–that happens in all fiction, is that your characters will change over the course of your novel. The difference here is that this usually occurs because the characters are shaped by their settings.

Setting

The setting of your novel is so very important in historical fiction, almost more so than in any other genre of fiction. It is almost a character in itself. Your characters are shaped by it. Because your story is historical and set in the past, your characters will be defined by it.

It means you must also research the moral constraints of the time period.

What were the social constructs of the day?

What was acceptable and unacceptable in terms of behavior?

As your characters are shaped by this, they will change and grow throughout the story based on these morals, constraints, and patterns of behavior.

It is also important to note that you will set your story in a specific geographical place and time. This will require lots of research. Make sure you know everything you need to know about your chosen place and time, and everything your readers will want and need to know to help them through the story.

We will talk more about research in a later lesson, but be prepared. Know that research is your best friend and the most essential tool when writing for this genre.




Plot Elements

The plot elements in an historical fiction novel can be quite unique, especially when compared to the plots of other genres. For example, the problem or problems in your historical fiction novel will usually be a result of the time and place that the story is occurring.

Another way that your conflicts or problems will be a result of time or place may simply be those moral constraints we talked about before. If you are writing a historical fiction romance novel, the courtship rituals were much different back then and this could be your characters’ problem, or it could be some type of familial censuring, such as an arranged marriage, which is causing the difficulties in your story.

Your research will be a great help in showing the reader this problem and allowing them to understand where your characters are coming from.

You want your readers to read along and really feel as if your story happened, the way readers do in Alice I Have Been. You cannot possibly know everything about the characters or the time period, you want your readers to feel that you do. They should be so swept up in your writing that they never stop to question or contradict a point. This is where a good, solid plot line comes in, as does good, solid research.

Theme

The themes of historical fiction are somewhat similar to the themes of any genre, which mostly is good versus evil. However, in historical fiction, we use the people and events from the past to shed light upon some basic truth about the past.

Style and Tone

The style of an historical fiction novel includes a great deal of detail. You want to use as much accuracy as possible. Your reader must feel like they are there, in the story, in that place and time, if you want to be successful.

Style is a very important element when writing for this genre.

If you were to write an historical fiction novel without giving any thought to the style, it might come out a little, well, odd. Because you live today and you are writing about the past, the language, word choice, vocabulary, etc. might not sound quite right. What you need to do is to come up with a style and a tone that fit with your story.

For an assignment I have to choose one historical figure and characterise them, so off I go! There is an assignment to complete for this lesson for that and then an exam to submit.

I think character is important and setting are the main ones you have to start off with as it sets the tone for the rest of your writing.

I have a novel in the works while I write this, and have written three chapters but I may have to learn to be more verbose and include more dialogue in it as I included in my first assignment in the first blog post series I did for this. I mentioned in my Introduction that I am more descriptive rather than putting lots more dialogue but I believe that you have to have a balance.

This next week I will be working on the rest of the Lesson while working at small goals of assignments and exams for each lesson, so I will post each lesson on the blog!

I hope you enjoy!

<p class="has-drop-cap" value="<amp-fit-text layout="fixed-height" min-font-size="6" max-font-size="72" height="80">EmmalisaEmmalisa

A List of my Favourite Author Blogs

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This week has been a little more hectic compared to my normal lifestyle of listening to music, watching my favourite TV shows and movies on Netflix or Google play, and reading a few books here and there and then using my new laptop to play my digital piano and record some songs for fun. I have started volunteering at Save the Children in Malaga which is a 10 minute drive down the road from me and I was excited to be starting there yesterday as they put me straight onto the “books”! in the warehouse. It is a fun job and I think for now it is the perfect job for me three days a week as I don’t have a permanenent full time job or anything, but I have one thing in the pipes music wise, so lets hope that works out down the line but that is another story for another time! I will keep you updated!


So, I started on unpacking books, and putting them into their categories, and I learnt a lot already just from the first two hours of working there!
I even remembered when they had a box for Art that that was the number 700 from the Dewey Decimal Classification System, so my brain was quite on par library wise!

It is so fun to be able to do the work, but lets see how its goes down the track! I recognised a lot of authors names, Dan Brown, Robert Ludlum, Di Morissey, you will always recognise author names when working in books, and so I have decided to make this post a little more delightful and create a list of my favourite authors names but also put their blog link with it so it gives you the chance to be able to check them out!!!!



My first and favourite one is:

1. Carrie Turansky – carrieturansky.com – this is such a stunning page and my favourite book of hers is “The Governess of Highland Hall”. I have probably mentioned that way too many times before! Her latest release is “No Journey too far” and I have read the rest of the Edwardian Bride Series and Shine like the Dawn. I want to get No Ocean too wide and Across the blue. You can sign up to her newsletter on her website and she also has a Book List!

2. Alena Kate Pettitt – of “The Darling Academy” – I just absolutely love the writings of her book Ladies Like Us as she goes through such beautiful topics such as Being a lady, being a darling!, emotional and social intelligence, and poise. My favourite section was on Defining your goals and aspirations as it really honed in on setting lifetime goals, and attitudes of the heart! It is beautiful written and you will not be disappointed if you purchase Ladies like us. She also has another book called English Etiquette which I want to get for myself! You can buy her books HERE.

3. DickensBlog – a Blog for all things Dickens! Here you can experience a blog page that promotes Charles Dickens’ books. There is a book you can get through this page called The Gospel in Dickens: Selections from His Work. It is $18US. I particularly liked the fact that on the 6th September 2020 that did an online conversation with a descendant of his!!! You will find this on the blog page link provided if you click on “A blog for all things Dickens!” You can easily subscribe.

4. Natasha Lester – This is particularly one of my favourites as she shares her “Writing Routine. ” She writes blogs that are more succinct and concise. For example, you should read How to Fit Writing Into Your Life: 6 Tips Based on My Writing Process on her website at natashalester.com.au. If you are a writer yourself, then articles and blogs are the way to go for you to read. It will give you so much more inspiration and will drive you to be a better writer!!!

I have the first two of her books.

The Paris seamstress

You will find this picture on my Instagram page.

The French photographer

She blogs every Tuesday and really sets her time working on her novels as you can see through her writing and blogs. So keep your eyes peeled every Tuesday, and her newsletters go out every Tuesday as well. So make sure to subscribe to her newsletter on the right hand side of the page/website.

I am excited to see her bring out The Paris Secret, but I am still on The Paris Seamstress and sooooooo excited and looking forward to reading the French Photographer as it looks completely stunning.

I don’t want to overload you with too many author blog pages, so I will stick to four for now and if I think of any more that I tend to read for myself I will create a Part 2!

So keep your eyes peeled incase I do do a part 2 of this blog. I hope that you enjoyed reading about these four favourite author blog pages of mine, and that you click on them and browse through them. There are some gems! and you never know some giveaways might be around the corner!

Emmalisa

xx

Do you have a favourite author blog?

If you don’t follow a blog of an author, do you follow any other type of bloggers?

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Sweet Sunday Smoothie


I have started to create more of a healthy ritual with a particular smoothie which was created by “The Beauty Chef”. I came across their Instagram and Facebook page and immediately felt like I needed and had to have the products!!!

Here I want to share with you my recipe of a delicious Sunday smoothie which was originally was from the Get up and Glow Smoothie but I took out a quarter of a small-medium ripe avocado, 2 Brazil nuts and freshly squeezed juice of 1/4 of a lime.

Combining healthy gut nourishing fibre and clean plant based proteins this smoothie is equal parts delicious and nutritious. With the goodness of antioxidant-rich fruits and the Glow Inner Beauty Essential – which contains bio-fermented Probiotic whole foods to support healthy skin, hair and nails.

Ingredients:

3/4 cup (100g) mixed frozen berries

1 teaspoon GLOW Inner Beauty Essential

1/2 scoop BODY Inner Beauty Support (vanilla)

3/4 cup (180ml) unsweetened almond milk, or your preferred nut milk

1/4 cup (60g) coconut yoghurt

Method:

Place all the ingredients in a high speed blender. Blend until smooth

And voila!

A berry Sunday Smoothie!

Emmalisa

Novel Writing 101 – Lesson 1 and 2

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Now that I am qualified as a Library Assistant and I have completed Styling Essentials, lots of new things are in the works.

I decided to take a novel writing course – a short one – online – so that I can further develop enhance my skills in that area of writing, so I am not just freely blogging, or typing away with no thought. Novel writing is not careless, it is complex, and there is so much to it that I thought it would be a challenge to take up a new course in something else that I love and am passionate about!

It is through Universal Class which is the same provider I used online when doing the Historical Fiction writing course online as well.

You start out with being shown what your Learning outcomes are, such as:

Defining what a novel is

Describe working philosophy

Summarize novel writing methods

Select a specific class to write about

Select a specific genre to write about

Select a point of view

Summarize manuscript formatting

Create a storyboard

Define the synopsis

Summarize 5 elements involved in fiction writing

Describe building character development

Describe plot/conflict development

Summarize plot requirements

Create the setting, theme, style and tone

Create the climax, identify critical scenes. Recognise cause and effect.

Create proper dialog and illustrative details

Write a conclusion. Edit and revise. Publish the work.

Lets begin with the first lesson!

LESSON 1

Definition of. a novel

“If there’s a book you really want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.”– Nobel Prize-winning American author Toni Morrison

With origins dating back to poetic prose from thousands of years ago — Elizabethan times, fanciful French romance narratives from the mid-17th century, and episodic, central-figure adventures from the Spanish Don Quixote era — novel writing is an art form that has long been an integral part of our culture.

WHAT IS A NOVEL?

  1. A fictional prose narrative of considerable length, typically having a plot that is unfolded by the actions, speech, and thoughts of the characters
  2. The literary genre represented by novels

In our contemporary world, the use of “novel” has shifted to focus more on the central character, than on the plot. Also playing a defining role in the novel, is the sense of realism. novels are developed as fictional stories the underlying element inherent in all are truisms based upon human behaviour and the ways in which we interact with others.

Novel Features

As a whole, the three primary features of a traditional novel include:

  • A cohesive, believable plot structure
  • Well-defined, credible characters
  • A strong undercurrent of reality

It has been said that a work of fiction is measured by how well, or poorly, the author is able to unify the story and control its impact. Therefore, the only obligation of the writer is to make the story flow well for the reader, and have strong elements of interest.

Classic Examples

  • Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility (1811), and Pride and Prejudice (1813); 
  • Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre (1847); 
  • Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights (1847); 
  • Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter (1850); 
  • Herman Melville’s Moby Dick (1851); 
  • Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884);
  • F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby (1925); 
  • Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises (1926); 

Can anyone write a novel?

wanting to write a novel, and actually writing it, are entirely different things. In order to produce a novel, you first will need to create a structure around your project, define your objectives, and prioritize this project in your life to ensure you follow it through to completion.

Novel Writing: Rewards and Payoffs

Attracted by the following rewards and personal payoffs, many people do go forth with their plans to write a novel.

  • Satisfaction of achieving a hard-earned goal.
  • Medium to utilize creative skills, which may not otherwise be used in one’s professional life
  • Opportunity to hone one’s writing skills
  • Forum to focus one’s ideas and life experiences
  • Area over which one does not need to conform to anyone’s standards or rules
  • Outlet to showcase one’s theories, ideas and creative visions (albeit masked within a work of fiction)
  • Ego-gratification endeavor, culminating in one’s name appearing on the book jacket of countless copies
  • Lasting legacy

Regardless of what becomes of the finished product — picked up by a publisher, self-published, bestseller, etc. — the fact that you stayed the course in writing your novel is something that will remain with you for your entire lifetime.

Committing to the generation of your novel, and seeing it through to completion, is an endeavor that will leave you with a new-found confidence that will carry over on to any project you put before yourself.

Ideally, the following chapters will help you feel more secure with the novel-writing process and, thus, better able to navigate as you head out on this memorable journey.

I had to upload an assignment

Lesson 1 Assignment

Here is what I did:

My favourite novel that I like to read is called The Governess of Highland Hall and the Author of the novel is called CARRIE TURANSKY

I am a sucker for English Historical Romance novels, and when I read this front to back, I loved it from the characters to the setting to the situations etc. It is a perfect and ideal novel to look at as it is my favourite english historical novel based in England.

This is one of my favourite books because I am a sucker for English Historical novels and out of all the ones I have read, this by far has to be my favourite because of the story, and the writing is so easy to read, yet so eloquent and very English at the same time without it being too verbose. 

It gives you a beautiful feel overall when reading, because of the choice of words, and the way it is written. The author puts words in a very articulate and expressive way through the characters view points and sets a delightful tone throughout the story. 

When the reader is reading this kind of book I believe that they would be experiencing something pleasant as even though there is a section with conflict, the way it is beautifully written, it would give a feeling of delightfulness, which is also captivating, enchanting, joyful and cheerful. 

I also had to submit three paragraphs for my novel and submit an Exam.

LESSON 2

“If you want to be a writer, you must do two things above all others: Read a lot and write a lot…reading is the creative center of a writer’s life…you cannot hope to sweep someone else away by the force of your writing until it has been done to you.”– Stephen King

Novel Writing Boot Camp 101

Writing Schedules”Try to write every day; if you don’t, you’ll lose the rhythm of your prose, as well as features of the plot, characters and, most importantly, your ‘voice’, the very timbre of the book that you are trying to maintain.” 
— David Armstrong, author of How Not to Write a Novel: Confessions of a Mid-list Author

Thus, in order to acquire a manner of discipline around your novel writing process, the first thing you will want to do (before mapping out the story lines, or fleshing out your characters), is to assess your project in terms of the total time it will require you to invest.

Once you have gained an idea as to the amount of time your novel will demand of you, you will then be able to determine when — during the course of your busy life — you will realistically be able to sit down, concentrate, and write.

if we were to effectively use the time on our writing that we spend aimlessly wandering the Internet or mindlessly watching television, then we should be able to carve out a sufficient number of writing sessions per week.

Focus/Motivation

After formulating a working writing schedule, you can shift your focus to the best ways for sustaining your motivation and ability to focus solely on your novel.

It is at this point that you may find yourself falling somewhat short in your ability to hold your attention throughout long, intense writing sessions. Fortunately, should you find this to be the case, there are numerous methods you can employ to increase your levels of concentration and motivation.Capturing your ability to focus on one activity for a sustained period of time, is something that can be greatly enhanced by integrating some form of regular meditation into your life. The simple act of learning how to sit still, and focus your mind, offers immeasurable benefits. Not only can it increase the satisfaction you derive on a daily basis, it can also contribute to your writing, in terms of allowing you to hold your thoughts for longer periods, and to explore multiple story scenarios without losing sight of the principle idea.

Helpful Novelist Tips

Chart your progress — Documenting the number of hours worked per day, and specific novel-related tasks accomplished, can be helpful in numbers of ways

Create an incentive for meeting your daily/monthly/overall writing goals — If you need to encourage yourself to stay on course, you may want to build in a series of goal-oriented incentives. 

upon wrapping up the entire novel, do something very, very nice for yourself! Go to the movies, buy yourself a new piece of jewellery, perhaps a pretty journal like I posted in my previous post, 4 Books to read this year in 2020. And buy yourself some flowers if no one else is going to buy them for you!

Good Health

As a whole, it is probably most important that, as you divide your time up among your family, friends, work, and writing, you pay attention to what you are eating, the amount of sleep you are getting, the time you are allocating to physical fitness activities, and the degree to which you are using stimulants, e.g., tobacco and caffeine.

While you are attempting to stay focused and encouraged, it is essential that you take good care of yourself to ensure that your productivity and the quality of your work do not suffer.

Lesson articles featured are:

How to overcome writers block: 14 tricks that work

Lesson 2 Assignment was:

Exercise: To get a realistic sense of the amount of work/time you will need to commit to writing your novel, take a few moments to look at your calendar and block out the day\times you can allocate to the project. You can begin by answering the following questions: 

1.  Realistically, how much time will you be able to commit per week to writing?

2.  Do you have an ideal timeframe for completing your novel?

3.  What types of activities, e.g., exercise, meditation, establishing calming environments can help you get and stay motivated during your blocked out writing sessions? 

I am about to submit this exercise tonight and then tomorrow will work on Lesson 3!

I showed you my example of my first assignment in Lesson 1.

In the comments tell me if you would enjoy doing a course on Novel Writing. Would you do Novel Writing 101?

What is your favourite novel to read?

Can you write Lesson 2’s exercise in the comments below?

Do you like to write during the day or night?

If you could quit your job and write for a living would you do it?

Emmalisa

Four Books to read this year in 2020


Today I went for a visit to Koorong the Christian bookstore in Mount Lawley PERTH Western Australia 🇦🇺

I bought two gifts on prayer but won’t include them here as I want to focus on the four that I bought for myself and you will see what categories they come under once I’ve talked about them.

I initially had all the books in a basket walking around the store before I purchased this stunning tote bag saying “Do everything in love”.

I absolutely love this bag, I was able to fit everything in it and the books fitted perfectly in it.

Next I bought a journal that is a Joyce Meyer journal. It’s got scriptures at the bottom like most Christian journals but at the top on the left it has quotes to do with that scripture. It is called Living a life I Love Journal 💓 I will be using it for either writing songs or a novel writing idea 💡 ✍️ and carrying it with me everywhere I go whether it’s this bag or my handbag.

I then bought The Faith of Queen Elizabeth which I was intrigued about for ages. Someone had told me about just on Saturday and I knew I HAD to have it! I will be posting this one on Instagram for sure! I bought three English historical novels From this moment is by Elizabeth Camden and she is the author of 8 historical novels and has been honoured with the RITA Award, the Christy awar and the carol award. She has a Masters in history and also library sciences, she is a research librarian by day and works on her novels at night. She lives in Florida. http://www.elizabethcamden.com

Stella West’s artistic talent made her the toast of London but when her sister dies under mysterious circumstances she abandons everything and heads for Boston. With single minded determination she fights to pierce the ring of secrecy surrounding her sisters death. Upon meeting Romulus White a publisher with connections into every important power circle in the city, she quickly realised he could be a valuable ally in navigating Boston society.

Romulus has been pursuing Stella for years to create art for his magazine. Her luminous illustrations are the missing piece he needs to propel his magazine to the forefront of the industry and he will stop at nothing to get her on board.

Sparks fly the instant they join forces but he is unsettled by the unwelcome attraction he feels towards Stella, fearing she might be the one woman who could disrupt his hard won independence. He may have finally met his match in Stella but is helping her solve the mystery of her sisters death worth the risk to his publishing empire?

This happily ever after romance tells the captivating story of two women bound together across time by a shared dream and a mysterious writing desk. 

Tenley Roth’s first book was a runaway bestseller. Now that her second book is due, she’s locked in fear. Can she repeat her earlier success or is she a fraud who has run out of inspiration?

With pressure mounting from her publisher, Tenley is weighted with writer’s block. But when her estranged mother calls asking Tenley to help her through chemotherapy, she packs up for Florida where she meets handsome furniture designer Jonas Sullivan and discovers the story her heart’s been missing.

A century earlier, another woman wrote at the same desk with hopes and fears of her own. Born during the Gilded Age, Birdie Shehorn is the daughter of the old money Knickerbockers. Under the strict control of her mother, her every move is decided ahead of time, even whom she’ll marry. But Birdie has dreams she doesn’t know how to realize. She wants to tell stories, write novels, make an impact on the world. When she discovers her mother has taken extreme measures to manipulate her future, she must choose between submission and security or forging a brand new way all on her own.

Tenley and Birdie are from two very different worlds, but fate has bound them together in a way time cannot erase. 

“Rachel Hauck enchants us again! Tenley and Birdie are bound together by the understanding that creativity is a guiding force and that their stories must be told. A tale both bittersweet and redemptive, The Writing Desk is your must-read.” —Patti Callahan Henry, New York Times bestselling author 

This sweet, split-time read is a standalone novel, though characters in this story appear in Rachel Hauck’s book, The Fifth Avenue Story Society. Includes discussion questions.

“To escape a scheme to marry her off to a dishonorable man, Margaret Macy flees London disguised as a housemaid. If she can remain unwed until her next birthday, she will receive an inheritance, and with it, sweet independence. But she never planned on actually working as a servant. And certainly not in the home of Nathaniel and Lewis Upchurch–both former suitors. As she fumbles through the first real work of her life, Margaret struggles to keep her identity secret when suspicions arise and prying eyes visit Fairbourne Hall. Can she avoid a trap meant to force her from hiding?