Coffee Yoghurt with nut Sprinkle


When it comes to dessert, stevia is your secret weapon for guilt free indulgence.

Combined with COFFEE and COCOA, UUUUMMMMM, YES PLEASE!!!!???
SPRINKLE


Preparation Time: 15 Minutes
plus setting time
COOKING TIME: 1 minute
SERVES 4

2 tsp powdered gelatine
400g low-fat Greek style yoghurt
1 tsp natural vanilla bean paste

1/4 cup of Sweet spiced nut

clusters

COFFEE SAUCE

2 tsp stevia granules

1 tsp unsweetened

cocoa powder

1/2 cup (125ml) freshly brewed double – strength espresso or good quality strong instant coff

STEP 1

To make the coffee sauce, combine all the ingredients in a small heatproof bowl and stir until stevia and cocoa powder have dissolved into the coffee.

Remove 1/4 cup (60ml) of the coffee sauce and set aside for serving

STEP 2

Sprinkle the gelatine over the remaining coffee sauce and set aside for serving.

Whisk to combine

Set aside for 5 minutes for the water to absorb into the gelatine. Heat the gelatine mixture in the microwave

In a 10 second burst on high until the mixture has dissolved and is translucent

STEP 3

Combine the yoghurt and vanilla in a large bowl. Transfer 1/2 a cup of the yoghurt mixture to a seperate bowl.

Working quickly, whisk the coffee gelatine mixture into the small amount of yoghurt.

Once combined, scrape this into the larger bowl. Working quickly, whisk until combined.

Pour into 4 serving cups or glasses then refrigerate for 2 hours, or until set.

STEP 4

Sprinkle the nut clusters evenly over the yoghurts and serve with the reserved coffee sauce on the side.

The Penguin Book of the British Short Story


Penguin Blog

Edited and introduced by novelist and journalist Philip Hensher, The Penguin Book of the British Short Story celebrates the diversity and energy of British writers. Here, Hensher introduces the collection. 

What do Britain’s short story writers do most characteristically? In some ways, I came to think of the exemplary British short story as Arthur Conan Doyle’s masterpiece ‘Silver Blaze’. It is extraordinarily playful with the conventions of its own genre, beginning with an indication of the murderer that could hardly be more explicit or blatant. It is concerned with a huge range of significant and interesting physical objects, including the elaborate dress that is never seen and its owner never identified. It is about the actions of the overlooked and misunderstood. It is about social class, of course. Like many great short stories from Britain, it revolves around a general social gathering with its own rituals – William Sansom’s wonderful…

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